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Sports Drinks & Energy Drinks: Proceed with Caution

Posted on September 14th, 2021

Cornelius dentist, Dr. Ryan Whalen at Whalen Dentistry discusses energy and sports drinks and the adverse effects they can have on children’s teeth.Dr. Ryan Whalen at Whalen Dentistry wants to make sure our patients know all about healthy hydration. Most people already know that soda and juice aren’t great for teeth, but now the American Academy of Pediatrics is cautioning parents and caregivers that sports and energy drinks have similar negative effects.

Sports drinks are intended to replace water and electrolytes lost while sweating from exercise. If a child is participating in vigorous, prolonged physical activity, their ingredients may be helpful—but during routine physical activity, plain water is best. Sports drinks can contribute to tooth decay and are high in calories. They are not intended for consumption any time other than strenuous workouts.

Energy drinks are a different—and more harmful—type of beverage, since they contain stimulants such as caffeine and taurine. Energy drinks are not appropriate for children or teens, as they can affect developing brains and cardiovascular systems. Water should be the primary source of hydration for kids.

If you want to know more about sports drinks or energy drinks, don’t hesitate to give us a call!

 

The content of this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.

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